Counterinsurgency [electronic resource]. United States.Dept. of the Army. United States.Marine Corps Combat Development Command. text Washington, D.C. : Headquarters, Dept. of the Army : Headquarters, Marine Corps Combat Development Command, Dept. of the Navy, Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps, [2006] eng This field manual/Marine Corps warfighting publication establishes doctrine (fundamental principles) for military operations in a counterinsurgency (COIN) environment. Mode of access: Internet from the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center web site. Address as of 3/20/07: http://usacac.army.mil/CAC/Repository/Materials/COIN-FM3-24.pdf; current access is available via PURL. Title from title screen (viewed Mar. 20, 2007). "December 2006." "This publication supersedes FMI 3-07.22, 1 October 2004, and MCWP 3-33.5, 29 January 1980"--P. i. Includes bibliographical references and index. This field manual/Marine Corps warfighting publication establishes doctrine (fundamental principles) for military operations in a counterinsurgency (COIN) environment. United States. Army United States. Marine Corps Counterinsurgency Military doctrine http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS79762 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Marine Corps Operating Concepts for a Changing Security Environment [electronic resource]. MARINE CORPS COMBAT DEVELOPMENT COMMAND QUANTICO VA. text Ft. Belvoir Defense Technical Information Center MAR 2006. eng The 21st Century Marine Corps provides the Commandant s broad guidance and direction for the future of our Corps. The forthcoming Naval Operating Concept will describe the evolving role of U.S. Naval forces in defense of the Nation. Operational Maneuver from the Sea is our conceptual foundation for littoral power projection. The concept of Seabasing advocates a means of rapidly deploying, employing and sustaining globally sourced forces in a manner that provides the President and the joint force commander additional political and military options for overcoming challenges posed by a changing security environment. Another concept, Distributed Operations, builds upon our warfighting philosophy and understanding of that environment to generate training, education and equipment innovations that will prepare Marines for the challenges ahead. This publication distills the Commandant s broad guidance and direction into a draft family of operating concepts, informed by Operational Maneuver from the Sea, and enabled by Seabasing and Distributed Operations, which describe the Marine Corps contribution to the National Defense Strategy. With additional context provided by the joint force campaign construct and the Marine Corps Midrange Threat Estimate: 2005-2015, this volume describes Marine Corps forces that will be organized, based, trained and equipped for forward presence, security cooperation, counterterrorism, crisis response, forcible entry, prolonged operations and counterinsurgency. The ideas presented herein are meant to inspire discussion, debate and feedback concerning how the Marine Corps will operate in the future. Designed as an interim product, it will be refined into an enduring body of work, nested under an overarching Naval concept, which will guide future capability development. The 21st Century Marine Corps provides the Commandant s broad guidance and direction for the future of our Corps. The forthcoming Naval Operating Concept will describe the evolving role of U.S. Naval forces in defense of the Nation. Operational Maneuver from the Sea is our conceptual foundation for littoral power projection. The concept of Seabasing advocates a means of rapidly deploying, employing and sustaining globally sourced forces in a manner that provides the President and the joint force commander additional political and military options for overcoming challenges posed by a changing security environment. Another concept, Distributed Operations, builds upon our warfighting philosophy and understanding of that environment to generate training, education and equipment innovations that will prepare Marines for the challenges ahead. This publication distills the Commandant s broad guidance and direction into a draft family of operating concepts, informed by Operational Maneuver from the Sea, and enabled by Seabasing and Distributed Operations, which describe the Marine Corps contribution to the National Defense Strategy. With additional context provided by the joint force campaign construct and the Marine Corps Midrange Threat Estimate: 2005-2015, this volume describes Marine Corps forces that will be organized, based, trained and equipped for forward presence, security cooperation, counterterrorism, crisis response, forcible entry, prolonged operations and counterinsurgency. The ideas presented herein are meant to inspire discussion, debate and feedback concerning how the Marine Corps will operate in the future. Designed as an interim product, it will be refined into an enduring body of work, nested under an overarching Naval concept, which will guide future capability development. Defense Systems. Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics. Marine corps. Security. Sea based. Military forces(united states) Military strategy. Environments. Crisis management. Response. Maneuvers. Counterinsurgency. National defense. Cooperation. Counterterrorism. Marine corps personnel. Guidance. Estimates. Defense systems. Threats. Distribution. Navy. http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA446044 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE Tentative manual for countering irregular threats [electronic resource] : an updated approach to counterinsurgency operations. United States.Marine Corps Combat Development Command. text [Washington, D.C.] : U.S. Marine Corps Combat Development Command, [2006]. eng Electronic monograph. System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader. Mode of access: World Wide Web. Title from PDF title screen (viewed Mar. 26, 2007). "07 June 2006." Includes bibliographical references. United States. Marine Corps United States. Marine Corps Counterinsurgency Military doctrine http://www.fas.org/irp/doddir/usmc/manual.pdf Offensive use of chemical technologies by US special operations forces in the global war on terrorism : the nonlethal option / Whitbred, George N. T. Air University (U.S.).Air Command and Staff College. text Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala. : Air War College, Air University ; Air University Press, [2006] eng "July 2006." Includes bibliographical references (p. 34-39). Nonlethal weapons. Chemical weapons Chemical warfare Special forces (Military science) Terrorism http://worldcatlibraries.org/wcpa/oclc/71262532&loc=23511 Lebanon: Consociation, Civil War, and the Search for Stability [electronic resource] Hemmer, Christopher text Air Command and Staff College 2005 eng In the three decades following independence from France in 1943, Lebanon was considered to be a model of a pluralistic, progressive, and moderate state in the Arab world. The achievements of the Lebanese state appeared all the more remarkable given the deeply divided nature of Lebanese society. With the onset of a 15-year civil war in 1975, however, the Lebanese model quickly took a darker meaning, signifying violent internal conflict exacerbated by external intervention leading eventually to a failed state. Since 1990, as a result, in part, of a large-scale Syrian presence in Lebanon, some measure of stability has returned. This stability, unfortunately, is probably more akin to an extended ceasefire rather than a political settlement as the basic issues that fueled the civil war in the first place have remained unresolved. Rather than offer a direct model that offers positive lessons that could in some way be applied to Iraq today, Lebanon instead offers a cautionary tale of problems to avoid if the US-led occupation of Iraq is to launch a stable and pluralistic regime in Baghdad. Mode of access: World Wide Web. System requirements: Adobe Reader. Syria Iraq 'civil war' ACSC NUMBER stability Christian power http://stinet.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=ADA430901&Location=U2&doc=GetTRDoc.pdf The Operational and Tactical Nexus: Small Steps Toward Seamless Effects-Based Operations [electronic resource] Riza, M. S. text AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY 2006 eng The literature on effects-based operations (EBO) seems to grow each day. Myriad definitions have appeared in service and joint doctrine writings as well as in other writings. Most are too far reaching for current capabilities, and they may be too far reaching for future capabilities. Both the United States Air Force (USAF) and the United States Joint Forces Command (USJFCOM) EBO definitions encompass all facets of national policy, including strategic outcomes. USAF and USJFCOM are attempting a quantum leap when smaller, more manageable steps are indicated to enable and embed an EBO culture in the planning community. Making the effort more difficult, service and joint doctrine writings often convey a sense of multipolarity when it comes to explaining EBO methodology. Joint planning doctrine is conceptually opposed to an idealized EBO methodology. Another impediment to EBO is a dichotomy in the way the USAF trains at the tactical level of war and the way EBO enthusiasts view campaigning at the operational level of war. One view focuses on events, missions, and platforms, while the other focuses on applying capabilities toward affecting systems and achieving a desired end state. The USAF purposefully evolved towards mission-based training programs following Desert Storm to link missions to combatant commanders desired capabilities. Unfortunately, this change fosters the misperception that missions are capabilities and leads to inefficient force presentation to the combatant commanders. Finally, though service and joint doctrine writings strive to distinguish the three levels of war, the officers who will plan campaigns matured during a time when the lines became increasingly blurred. Mode of access: World Wide Web. System requirements: Adobe Reader. EBO joint planning Air force objectives USAF missions http://stinet.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=ADA449086&Location=U2&doc=GetTRDoc.pdf Reluctant Samurai? Partnering With Japan To Combat Terrorism [electronic resource] West, Derek A. text Air University 2006 eng The tragedies of 11 September 2001 brought into focus the United States and Japans shared common values and vulnerability to asymmetric attacks by terrorists. It was as if a flash of lightning from out of the blue illuminated shared fears around the world. Memories of the gas attack on the subway system of Tokyo in March 1995 intensified the horror felt by the Japanese people as they watched the World Trade Center attack on television. System requirements: Adobe Reader. Japan terrorism military national 'United States' Security forces War https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2006/acsc/West.pdf Afghanistan: Current Operational Lessons From the Soviet Experience [electronic resource] Caffrey, Matthew text The Air Command and Staff College (ACSC) 2005 eng Afghanistans harsh geography and harsher climate has always made it difficult to conquer and even harder to occupy. Its diverse and warlike people know how to fight and when not to fight. On 27 April 1978, Afghan Communists launched a successful coup intended to transform Afghanistan from a diverse tribal society into a unified Communist state. The governments attacks on landlords, religious leaders and tribal elders reinforced the Afghan tendency to oppose any form of central government. Despite increasing Soviet aid, it appeared in late 1979 that the Afghan Communist government would fall. Soviet advisors blamed overzealous and inept indigenous leaders who would not follow advice. The Soviet Union did not want a Communist government on its borders to be overthrown because of the potential internal domino effects, especially in Moslem dominated regions of the Soviet Union (like Chechnya. Fortunately, from the Soviet perspective, their forces had effective models for coping with such situations. Twice before, in Hungary (1956) and Czechoslovakia (1968), Soviet forces led coups to secure the capitals followed by major force deployments to occupy cities and to intimidate the population. System requirements: Adobe Reader. Soviet Afghan resistance air forces government tactics international https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2005/acsc/ACSC05-01.pdf Vietnam 1964-65: Escalation versus Vietnamization [electronic resource] Cain, Anthony C. text Acrobat Distiller 6.0 (Windows) 2005 eng In 1964 President Lyndon Johnson faced the defining decision of his administration, whether to abandon South Vietnam to Communist insurgents or to escalate US troop levels and roles in fighting the Communists. Even before Johnson took office in the wake of President Kennedys assassination, advisors assessed that the Communist Viet Cong were winning the war in the South. Early in his administration, Johnson focused on an aggressive and liberal domestic agenda designed to transform the role of government and the condition of vast segments of US society. The last thing that he needed or wanted was a protracted war to steal the momentum from his domestic economic and social programs. The American president also did not want to appear weak or soft on Communism either at home or abroad. Like many in his administration, Johnson believed that the insurgency in South Vietnam was part of a larger global ideological struggle that pitted liberal democratic systems against a monolithic Communist threat. In this context, South Vietnams fall to Communist insurgents could threaten the very fabric of American society. System requirements: Adobe Reader. Vietnam government 'South Vietnam' forces insurgents troops war escalation https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2005/acsc/ACSC05-03.pdf Building Indigenous Security Forces in the Face of an Insurgency: Vietnam [electronic resource] Weaver, Michael text Acrobat Distiller 6.0 (Windows) 2005 eng The United States faced a terrible set of problems when it attempted to build up South Vietnams ability to defend itself. South Vietnam was in turmoil between 1963 and 1966; political factions were more concerned with governmental power and self-preservation than they were with securing the country against communist insurgents. The central government bore more of a resemblance to a warlords court than it did to a nascent democracy. Leaders within the Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN) preoccupied themselves more with perks and casualty avoidance than with fighting the enemy. US leaders reacted with disdain and contempt, and became much more directive in the war, not only with their decision to introduce massive numbers of US ground troops in 1965, but also with their decision to act more as ARVN troop commanders they were assisting than as advisors endeavoring to produce effective, independent-thinking officers. Later in the war, however, the two allies achieved some notable successes against the insurgency. System requirements: Adobe Reader. Vietnam police forces insurgents army 'South Vietnam' units ARVN https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2005/acsc/ACSC05-13.pdf THE UNITED STATES NOTHERN BORDER: HOW CAN WE DETER INTERNATIONAL TERRORISTS [electronic resource] ALSID, MARK B. text AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY 2006 eng Terrorism and our efforts as a nation to counter it is a very difficult and expensive endeavor. Border security is vital to the safety of our population. Yet, it is only through applying or implementing a clear well designed system of monitoring, surveillance and apprehension that we will be in a position to feel safe from intruders with terrorist intents. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was created to deal with this problem, and among many other functions, it was designed to restructure the way by which we manage and protect our borders. This effort will begin the robust and interconnected use of available assets are required to attack this security issue, which means we are beginning to move in the right direction. System requirements: Adobe Reader. terrorist border Canada 'United States' Islamic security America Muslims https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2005/awc/Alsid.pdf The Future of the European Security and Defence Policy [electronic resource] Alt, Josef text Air Command Staff College 2006 eng European heads of state and government took a crucial step toward the development of a new European Security and Defence Policy (ESDP) at the European Unions (EUs) Helsinki summit in December 1999. They created the ESDP to allow the European Union to play a more comprehensive role in civilian and military international crisis management backed by credible military power. Today, the ESDP is considered a key element of the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) pillar of the European Union. This paper analyzes how the ESDP will develop. It describes briefly the evolution of the ESDP and analyzes the relations between the EU and the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO). System requirements: Adobe Reader. European EU NATO security military states member 'member states' https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2006/acsc/Alt.pdf The American Military And The Media: Historical Lessons and Future Considerations [electronic resource] Burns, Brian D. text AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE 2007 eng Over the last 50 years, various technological advances have fueled the publics need for rapid satisfaction. Whether it is the cure for the common cold or the arrival of an important package, the common theme is faster is always better. This fact is most evident in the demand for current and accurate information across an array of diverse areas: music, sports, stock quotes we want information as fast as possible. This need for information has created a multitude of news outlets across the media spectrum (TV, newspapers, magazines, etc.) that compete to be the first to bring the coverage to the audience. System requirements: Adobe Reader. military news media war reporting reporters embedded coverage https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2006/acsc/Burns.pdf Centralized Supply Chain Management: Command and Control of Sustainment [electronic resource] Ellmyer, Eric G. text AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE 2006 eng This paper explores why the AF should consolidate the operational function of supply support, why it is needed, and what to do about it. Consolidation will provide a stable infrastructure when conflicts go from peace time to war time operations. The AF must create a supply chain management enterprise that makes operations more efficient, more effective, and reduce costs while providing sustained levels of weapon system availability. The USAF doctrine of decentralized execution is applied to the business side of the USAF, supply support, with little application of the concept of centralization. The only exception of the rule is when the Air Force employs the application of airpower, in other words, weapons system use. Transportation Commands use of airlift is a great example of the power centralization has to an organization. The same could be said about centralizing operational supply to improve weapons system availability. The goal of improving weapon system availability can be achieved by integrating materiel management functions in a supply chain management enterprise. System requirements: Adobe Reader. Force Air management supply support 'Air Force' weapon combat https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2006/acsc/Ellmyer.pdf Iran's Youth Bulge And Its Implications for US National Security [electronic resource] Harris, Brendan M. text AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE 2006 eng Irans intransigence over its nuclear development program is only the latest episode in which Tehran has made international news headlines and is at least part of the reason 27 percent of Americans consider Iran as Washingtons greatest menace. Irans February 2006 announcement it would resume enriching uranium underscored the tension that has existed between Washington and Tehran since the 1979 Iranian Revolution. Then, after insurrectionists seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran and held Americans hostage for 444-days, Washington cut formal relations and has since relied on other countries such as France and Russia to deal with Tehran. But it may be time for Washington to begin dealing directly with Tehran rather than working through proxies. After all, Iran is both regionally and strategically significant. System requirements: Adobe Reader. youth bulges 'youth bulges' political Iran 'political instability' countries population https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2006/acsc/Harris.pdf A-10s over Kosovo [electronic resource] Haun, Phil M. text Air Command and Staff College 2004 eng In the spring of 1999, NATO engaged in a precedent setting air campaign over Serbia and Kosovo known as Operation Allied Force (OAF). This event marked a milestone for airpower, as it was, arguably, the first time airpower alone was decisive in achieving victory in combat. By the end of the conflict, in June 1999, America and its allies had mounted a monumental effort to achieve the immediate goals of halting ethnic cleansing in Kosovo and providing for the return of hundreds of thousands of refugees. Ground forces, introduced following the end of the air campaign, have subsequently been employed to secure the peace. Several books have already been written about OAF, though not as many as might have been expected given the implications for NATO and airpower that came out of that conflict. Those that have been written focus primarily on the strategic level, the events, diplomacy, and decisions by senior military and political leaders that led to the conflict and determined its conduct. This is not that kind of book. This is about the other end of the spectrum as told by those that flew and fought at the most basic level during the war the A 10 pilots of the 40th Expeditionary Operations Group (EOG). System requirements: Adobe Reader. A-10 Air Force Col mission Allied combat Haave https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2004/books/Haun.pdf The need for a USAF UAV center of excellence [electronic resource] Kniskern, Kenneth M. text Air Command and Staff College 2006 eng Necessity is the mother of invention. In 360 B.C., the philosopher Plato eloquently quoted this statement by his teacher Socrates in his writing The Republic. When Socrates spoke of this he was referring to the ideal state, which when faced with a need or problem, will encourage creative efforts to satisfy this need or problem. Throughout the last century of warfare, the necessity to defeat the enemy in a more efficient way contributed to innovations in combat tools. J.C.H. Fuller, when writing about the anatomy of battle in WWI, spoke of the effects of the tank. For the first time a soldier had, with one single tool of warfare, increased mobility, security from the negative effects of bullets, and the ability to discharge his weapons from a moving platform protected by a fixed shield. From WWI to todays operations in Iraq, fielded forces depend heavily on the tank for protection and projection of force. System requirements: Adobe Reader. UAV Air Force aircraft unmanned USAF combat 'Air Force' https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2006/acsc/kniskern.pdf Effects-based operations: air power as the sole military instrument of power, has it matured enough? [electronic resource] Kristensen, Jan Graugaard text AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE 2006 eng Operations Allied Force and Enduring Freedom are the only combat operations the Royal Danish Air Force has ever participated in with combat aircraft (F-16). The general perception is that the operations were highly successful for, and because of, the application of air power. The Danish Armed Forces are not joint within the national structure in spite of their small size. The philosophy is that jointness is achieved through combined operations. Each service has small, but, numerous internationally deployable assets. Consequently, these assets will always be part of a larger international contribution; thus the combined aspect will ensure jointness within the national structure. System requirements: Adobe Reader. air Force 'air power' NATO military targets OAF campaign https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2006/acsc/kristensen.pdf Using the media in theproper cultural context to win Iraqi and US hearts and minds in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom [electronic resource] Lampley, Kingston text AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE 2006 eng Media sources (newspapers, magazines, television programs, radio broadcasts, etc.) are not capable (on their own) of winning the hearts and minds of any given population. The media is simply a tool which delivers heart-changing and mind-changing ideals (such as the greatness of democracy and respect for minority rights) and information (such as the positive results of the US-led occupation of Iraq). These ideals and information will change the hearts and minds of a populace. The media is simply a conduit of these ideals and information. System requirements: Adobe Reader. Iraqi people government media minds 'Iraqi people' Islam hearts https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2006/acsc/Lampley.pdf The final frontier: news media's use of commercial satellite imagery during wartime [electronic resource] McKenna, Sean S. text AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE 2006 eng It is a long held belief the news media will go to almost any length to get a story. Television reporters have waded into the middle of civil-war firefights to show viewers and readers human suffering up close, used hidden camera tricks to flush out stories on consumer fraud, and even laid down their lives to expose human rights atrocities by international governments. Over the last 10 years, in the midst of a telecommunications revolution, the media can now gather and report stories in ways that once seemed impossible. System requirements: Adobe Reader. images satellite 'satellite imaging' media news commercial government 'remote sensing' https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2006/acsc/mcKenna.pdf Ethnic discontent in western China: can China's provincial policy contain instability? [electronic resource] Mosle, William B. text AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE 2006 eng At the beginning of the 21st Century, the rise of China as a peer competitor to the United States has become the dominant national security issue for US Pacific Command (USPACOM). US security interests with China are dominated by high profile issues including 284 billion dollars in annual trade,1 tension over Taiwan, Chinas military buildup as well as its growing regional influence. Each issue has garnered significant attention, since they affect vital US national security interests. To effectively engage with China, USPACOM must understand China; how it acts and why it acts. Internal China security issues provide an insightful window into the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) policy and motivations. Analyzing the PRCs internal policies and their effects makes the inscrutable China Tiger more understandable. This paper examines one internal security issue the PRCs provincial policy and its ability to contain instability in Chinas western autonomous regions, Xinjiang and Tibet. System requirements: Adobe Reader. provincial China PRC Xinjiang policy discontent economic Tibet https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2006/acsc/Mosle.pdf Minefields In The Caribbean: A Region Vectored To Becoming Failed States [electronic resource] Reid, Orville text AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE 2006 eng The Caribbean islands are riddled with poverty, crime, and corruption and these problems are mines that eventually will explode into a regional incident. First, it is important to understand the history of the Caribbean; categorize and describe the minefields (poverty, crime, and corruption) in the region; and give a perspective on who planted these mines and how the mines are being nurtured. This sets the foundation to tackle how to defuse these mines and show why the US should help. The culmination is a look at life without these minefields in the Caribbean. This paper focused on the larger Caribbean islands that are most progressive in the region such as the Bahamas, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, and Barbados. These islands carry enough clout in the region where smaller islands in the region merely mimic the approach of these larger and more progressive islands. This leads to the assumption that if these larger islands become failed states then the smaller islands will follow suit. System requirements: Adobe Reader. Caribbean countries region crime corruption poverty mines 'Caribbean countries' https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2006/acsc/Reid.pdf Joint transformation of aerial interdiction by enhancing kill box operations [electronic resource] Smith, Kenneth A. text AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE 2006 eng The interaction of air and ground warfare is as old as military aviation itself. As far back as WWI, air interdiction (AI) and close air support (CAS) have been integral missions supporting overall campaign objectives. Originally conceived as a mission to support military ground operations, the purpose of aerial interdiction has gradually changed and widened over time. In World Wars I and II, Korea, Vietnam, and Desert Storm, interdiction campaigns attempted to disrupt and destroy enemy goods and supply routes to such levels that any attempt by the enemy to conduct offensive operations would prove futile. In the Balkan theater, commanders used interdiction campaigns to coerce Serbian leader Slobodan Milosevic to end ethnic cleansing in Kosovo. The above examples represent both the traditional use of ground attack as well as the more recent focus of coercing an opponent with air power. These historical examples also show how operational planners have adjusted campaigns to meet campaign objectives. Planners had to develop tactics that overcame issues that normally plague campaigns. Issues of denying sanctuary to an enemy, ensuring accurate battle damage assessment (BDA) using solely air power, and safely integrating ground forces with in the aerial interdiction construct are just a few of the many concerns that commanders historically face when conducting AI operations. Like in the past, in todays combat environment, planners are facing new operational interdiction challenges. System requirements: Adobe Reader. forces air kill boxes 'kill box' ground interdiction AI https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2006/acsc/Smith.pdf The american way of war, small wars & U.S. military transformation [electronic resource] Sparks, Randall G. text AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE 2006 eng The American way of war is a popular topic of debate among military thinkers. Many argue for a singular strategy or way of war for the U.S. military. Defense Secretary Rumsfeld has driven the Department of Defense (DoD) headlong into his vision of a military transformation that values technology, speed, and flexibility. His noble goal is to prepare the military to fight whatever future threat may arise. This transformation does not intend to promote a singular way of war. Yet in the changes it emphasizes, it favors capabilities better suited for strategies of annihilation and large scale conflict more than it creates capabilities for small wars. Real military transformation must include more than advanced technologies, organizations, and doctrines. It should offer additional military options not just improvements to options that already exist. System requirements: Adobe Reader. wars military strategy conflict American forces enemy transformation https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2006/acsc/Sparks.pdf Looking for gold nuggets in the melting pot: language, cultural awareness, and the fourth generation warrior [electronic resource] Stenmark, Timothy E. text AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE 2006 eng Fourth Generation Warfare (4GW) requires more than just superior technology, firepower, and stand-off capability. Fighting a 4GW adversary requires boots on the ground, functional language and cultural awareness to facilitate the collecting of actionable intelligence, the ability to know when and how to go kinetic, and more importantly, when to show restraint and patience. The training of friendly indigenous forces, civil affairs projects to restore and improve living conditions and independence, and building relationships with locals are significant factors in the effort to win the hearts and minds campaign. How to gain the all-important language and cultural awareness is a challenge facing our military forces, and the subject of this paper. Until recently, the focus has been on language and cultural training. By and large, when such training actually occurs, it has been limited, conducted just in time prior to deployment, and followed by on-site orientation and on-the-job training in theater. Some more rigorous training is being conducted, however. The Army Special Operations school has long recognized the value of longer-term learning, offering programs for more in-depth language and cultural training. System requirements: Adobe Reader. cultural Arabic Iraq forces Marine native training language https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2006/acsc/stenmark.pdf Understanding muslim prejudices toward Israel during the British Mandate period in Palestine [electronic resource] Tirone, Michael G. text AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE 2006 eng Americas viewpoint on terrorism changed dramatically on September 11, 2001. The people of the United States had no idea that an organization on the other side of the world, with a deep hatred for our country, would plan a detailed attack in order to produce as many civilian casualties as possible and disrupt the very fabric of our democratic society. In New York City, hijacked commercial airplanes flew into, and destroyed, two of the tallest buildings in America that represented the financial capitol of our country. In Washington, D.C., a hijacked airliner crashed into the Pentagon building, the headquarters of the most powerful military in the world. A fourth hijacked airliner crashed in a field in Pennsylvania, killing all passengers onboard, and whose intended target was likely the White House or the U.S. Capitol. The combination of events that day transformed our country from a nation at peace, enjoying the prosperity of capitalism and freedom, to a nation beginning a war of unknown length, against an enemy who uses terrorist tactics to strike non-combatants and engage in unconventional warfare against our military. System requirements: Adobe Reader. Arab Jews Palestine British Israel War Muslim countries https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2006/acsc/Tirone.pdf Forging a combat mobility culture [electronic resource] Tucker, Dennis P. text AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE 2006 eng A survey of the various elements of Air Mobility Command (AMC) reveals a distinct cultural change throughout the organization. From the top leadership to the unit level, many in AMC have either adopted or are in the process of adopting a warfighting mindset, looking for ways to mitigate the threat instead of avoiding the threat environment. The current mobility culture is more combat focused, and more capable of meeting the challenges of a non-permissive environment. No longer is the mobility air force (MAF) simply following standard rules and regulations to ensure personnel, cargo and fuel are delivered to the right warfighters, at the right place and time. Instead, the MAF is responding to the transformational defense agenda directed by the President of the United States and articulated in the 2001 Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) and to the operational experiences of the last four years. System requirements: Adobe Reader. culture Air combat Force MAF airlift tactical Mobility https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2006/acsc/Tucker.pdf Nuclear Iran: framing the US response using a scenario based approach [electronic resource] Vaughn, John E. text AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE 2006 eng Iran will have nuclear weapons. Diplomatically, the United States is unable to stop it. Economically, the United States is unable to stop it. If the United States attacks Iran preemptively, Iran will use its oil reserves as leverage to cripple the United States economy, damaging global economies in the process. The international community at large would then pressure the United States to cease all operations against Iran. This paper looks at these issues in-depth while using a scenario-based approach to form a U.S. response to a nuclear-armed Iran. If the United States elects to be proactive in dealing with Iran, it will seek regime change. Yet, the Iranian people have now rallied behind their current regime in the face of U.S. opposition. System requirements: Adobe Reader. Iran nuclear weapons United ' nuclear weapons' 'United States' oil international https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2006/acsc/Vaughn.pdf A look down the slippery slope: domestic operations, outsourcing, and the erosion of military culture [electronic resource] Watson, Bryan D. text AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE 2006 eng This paper discusses two simultaneous trends inside Americas military culture its increasing domestic role and its growing reliance upon defense contractors. First, the appropriate role of a standing military in a democratic society is an issue that has been the focus of significant debate ever since the founding of our republic. The issue becomes even more complex when the militarys mission takes on a domestic tone; in other words, domestic military operations can quickly result in diminished public support. Second, recent conflicts have shown a dramatic increase in the extent to which American armed forces rely upon commercial enterprises in order to achieve military objectives. System requirements: Adobe Reader. military contractors Force domestic Air American civilian 'Air Force' https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2006/acsc/Watson.pdf The making of a great captain [electronic resource] Weibel, Theodore G. text AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE 2006 eng Classifying people as Great Captains is largely a subjective perception. What attributes, accomplishments, positions attained or battles won that make one person a Great Captain and the other not? Herein lays the dilemma, for ages academics have argued what criteria should be included or not, but it remains a highly subjective yet colloquial anti-analytical process. This paper examines the argument that Great Captains are a product of their family, highly educated from an early age, possess qualities of a genius, encounter grand life experiences compared to their contemporaries, espouse leadership from a young age, and capsulate their experiences by mastering their cultural ethos with domineering influence via political-military accomplishments. This examination will look into the education, life experiences, leadership, and ethos mastering of Gustavus Adolphus, Napoleon, and Grant. System requirements: Adobe Reader. 'Great Captains' military genius age education army battle society https://research.maxwell.af.mil/papers/ay2006/acsc/WEIBEL.pdf
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